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Brownie Books 

By Palmer Cox 

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DO YOU KNOW THEM ? 

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Around the World— The 
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THE BROWNIES 
MANY MORE NIGHTS 



BY 
PALMER COX 




PUBLISHED BY 
THE CENTURY CO. 

NEW YORK 



Copyright, igi2, 1913, by The Century Co. 



Published, ffeptemher, 1913 




c 



PftOPEfiTY OF THS 
CUY OF NEW YOBK 



Ch 

£910455' 




rQrawiies. liHe fairies find ^oblitis nre 
imtigiHEiry liTtle spriTes wfjonresupposed 
to deli^lit in Ijarmlessprnrilis nrid Ijelpful 
deeds, Tfjey worts and sporf wl|ile wenry 
l]ou5ptiolds sleep and rjever a I low rfjein- 
selves to be seeti by mortal eyes. 





CONTENTS 



#K;:. 




The Brownies ix the Grist-Mill 



PAGE 
. 1 



The Brownies and the Stalled Train 




13 




The Brownies Mend the Dam . 24 



The Brownies at Haymaking 




37 




The Beowxies and the Railroad 49 



The Brownies Aid the 
Expedition . 




61 




The Brownies Shearing Sheep 



73 



The Brownies and the Burned Village . . ^^S^t^T^x^"^ 85 





The Brownies Bt^ld a Bridge 



98 




The Brownies Find Work for the 

Veterinary 109 



The Brownies and the Elec- 
tric Light Plant 




121 




The Brownies Christmas Bells 



135 




BOOKS BY PALMER COX: 
PUBLISHED BY THE CENTURY CO. 

THE BROWNIES: THEIR BOOK 

Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50 a 



ANOTHER BROWNIE BOOK 

[[white' ll Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards. $1.50 

HOUSE ( 

THE BROWNIES AT HOME 




Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards ■'^1.50 



THE BROWNIES AROUND 
THE WORLD 









'•"-■-s \ Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards Si. 50 

THE BROWNIES THROUGH 

THE UNION *^ 

Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50 

THE BROWNIES ABROAD 

Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50 

THE BROWNIES IN THE 
PHILIPPINES 

i>>»J^|^|iK4'|jflfl Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards. $1.50 ^ 

THE BROWNIES LATEST ^^^^-V 

ADVENTURES ^^ 

Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards. Sl.SO '«'S=i->'^^ 

THE BROWNIES MANY MORE 
NIGHTS 

Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50 ^ 

THE BROWNIE CLOWN OF 
BROWNTETOWN 

Oblong, 103 pages. Price, in boards, $1.00 

THE BROWNIE PRIMER 

ij?* 12 mo, 108 pages. Price, in clotli. $ .40 net. 








THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL 



ROUND the mill the Brownies strode 
Where wheels were still, 
though water flowed. 
Said one: "A labor strike, I fear, 
Has made it so deserted here ; 

And, on the belts that now 

should run. 
The crafty spider's web 

is spun." 
Another said: "That 's not 

the case. 
The miller here has quit 

the place 
Because complaints of lack 

of skiU 
Were piled much higher than the mill 
1 




To laugh alone may 

selfish seem, 
Let someone join you 

in the scream. 




THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



Some said tlie bread 
was slow to rise. 

More found no joy 
in cakes or pies. 




The bread, indeed, 
was not a treat, 



For frost had spoiled the farmer's wheat. 
But, that the flour might go round. 
The wheat must in the mill be ground. 

The corn, no better as a crop, 

Refused to rij^en, or to pop ; 

And so the children felt their share 

Of hardship and misfortune there. 

The hopper must take uj) its clack, — 

We '11 bring the hmn of business back. 

And stir the spider in her net ; 

"We 've several hours to midnight yet. 




THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 




It is, you know, the time of year 
For puddiugs, cakes, and all good cheer, 
When pies should from the oven slide, 
A father's joy, a mother's pride. 
To nothing say of younger eyes, 
Where quality gives way to size, 
And criticisms as to make 
Rest easy on both pie and cake. 
No second-rate, makeshift affair 
Should in the face of diners stare, 
But something that would i^raise inspire, 
And make one edge the table nigher. 
We '11 find the grain, in cars around, 
That to some foreign land is bound ; 
It could not serve a better end 
Than prove to folks at home a friend. 




The Chinamen can boil their rice, 
And Filipinos live on mice, — 



THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



(We understand that naught can rim 
Around on legs beneath the sim, 
Or crawl about in sand or clay, 
But to their kettles finds its way.) 
Let work in which we '11 take delight 
Now occupy our time to-night." 
Another cried: "We '11 start the mill, 
And set things moving with a will. 
We 've but to let the water go 
Upon the wooden wheel below, 
And everything that rests above 
Will get a most decided shove ; 






'T is not in love, nor 
hate, nor bliss. 

To change some na- 
tures made amiss. 



For water that goes bubbling by 
Contains a i30wer that makes things fly. 
The belts will then conunence their race. 
As though to find a hidmg-place, 
The idle cogs begin to mesh, 
And start each other 's work afresh, 
And soon you '11 hear the rumbling sound 
The miller hears the season round. ' ' 
Some ran for oil with eager zeal, 
And with it eased the whirring wheel. 
4 



THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 




Though some was lost 

through leaky cans, 
'T was not enough 

to spoil their plans, 
And nisty bearings 

here and there 
Ran as if cushioned 

on the air. 
The mill, with heavy 

post and beam, 
That stood half-way 

across the stream, 
Was made to start 

at dead of night, 
Before the touch of 

Brownies bright ; 



For they knew how the gate to raise 
As if they 'd done it all their days ; 
Could shake the bolt, and pick the stone. 
And run the business as their own. 
United effort was required 
To raise the gate as they desired, 
But let alone the Brownie band 
To carry out a scheme as planned ! 
Unfinished work is seldom found 
Behind the sprites when day comes round. 
It may take strength, it may take weight, 
It may take action more than great, 
But gates wall rise, and floods will flow. 
And wheels will turn, as well we know. 




THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



It takes good work to run a mill, 
For hands may never long be still ; 





And eyes mvist note when oiling dries 

Or hopiiers clatter for supplies. 

But with the Brownies at the task, 
The mill itself no more could ask. 
For every worker had his toil. 
And every bearing had its oil, 
While every belt was tight with strain, 
And every hopper heaped with grain. 
In such a place, with wheels at play, 
'T was hard to tell where danger lay ; 
6 



THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



On shafts and belts, when off their guard, 
A few went through some trials hard. 
And, but that friends with 

courage grand 
And action prompt ^vere 

near at hand, 
They might have needed 

some repair 
To bones as well as 

outer wear. 
A few who, in their secret way, 
Had watched the miller, 

day by day 
In summer-time, when grists 

were slow 
And fish were running to 

and fro, 
Came from the mill to try 

their fate. 
With hook and line and 

squirming bait 
And quick to take the 

miller's stand 
They brought some handsome 

fish to land 
And little cared if trout 

they took 
Or pickerel dangled from the hook. 
Said one : "A touch of sport you '11 find 
Well rooted in a Brownie's mind, 




THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



A pleasure-seeking trait 

that will 
Assert itself through 

trials still. 
And that is well ; why should 

one toil 
Nor lift his eyes above 

the soil? 




1 


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• ,.; ; . .v^-: ;: Where we both work 
.^;.;;^"v-;- ; and sport unite 

We play our Brownie's 
part aright." 
The wheels and mill stones 
had no rest 
Since first they started at their best, 



The belts and pulleys 

on the tear 
Created such a g-ust 

of air 
The spiders that in 

waiting hung 
Were through the open 

windows flung, 
With scattered legs from 

bodies sheared, 
In groups and pairs 

they disappeared, 




THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



And never after spun a snare 

To catch a wandering insect there. 

The people in the village round 

Soon heard the clack and runil)ling sound, 




And wondered who had claimed the right 
To start the mill at dead of night, 
But soon their drowsy eyelids closed 
And no one stirred or interposed. 
*'At times we find 



A Brownie said 

It hard on body and on mind 

To carry through the tasks aright 

That beckon us from pleasures bright ; 

But often people seem to need 

A hint from elves by word or deed. 

When fires burn low for want of wood 

Or pantry-shelves lack something good, 

When human hands are prone to rest. 

Or lost the key of treasure chest. " 




Look where you will 
you '11 find a few 

Who with good deeds 
are beating you. 



THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 



The story goes, next morning found 
A full supply of bushels ground ; 
And better still, nigh every door 
In all the place, two bags or more 




Of flour as fine as one could wish 
"Were standing ready for the dish ; 
And then such pudding, pie, and cake 
They carried not a jDain nor ache ! 




Then cookies rolled 

without a stop, 
Like buttons ui 

a tailor shop. 
Upon the table, chair, 

and floor, 
And still the fingers 

spread for more. 
The children from the 

blankets crawled. 



THE BROWNIES IN THE GRIST-MILL. 

The babies in their cradles bawled 

To take a hand at mixing flour 

The Brownies ground through mystic power, 

No picnic that was ever planned 
On grandest scale in all the land, 
Had such effect in bringing out 
The choicest pastry thereabout. 




From house to house the greeting flew, 
"Oh, are you at it? good for you! 
I never knew until this hour 
Just what it meant to have good flour!" 





THE BROWNIES IN THE GRISTMILL. 

The hands that scarce had been in dough 

Suice Christmas time, a year ago, 

Now caught tlie inspiration neAV 

And all their force to kneading threw. 

All white to shoulders 

was each dame 
As from the flour bag she came 
To add another batch of stuff 
To what already seemed enough. 
Men talked and tried to catch 

the drift 
Of such a strange, unlooked-for 
gift, 

Some called to mind the rack-a-tack, 

That through the night kept sluhiber back, 

But never guessed the Brownie band 

Had in the matter moved a hand. 





12 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED 

TRAIN 




TRAIN was stalled a mile or more 
From where it should have 
brought its store 
Of goods, to meet the great demand 
With holidays so close at hand. 
The engine scarcely could be found 
'Mid drifting snow that piled aromid ; 




The engineer had quit his lever 
Until the men made some endeavor 
13 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 

To give the iron horse a show 

Upon the track beneath the snow. 

By chance the Brownies reached the scene 

At evening, as the moon serene 

Was struggling through the snowy cloud 

That wrapped the mountain like a shroud. 

Said one, "We '11 lay aside our play, 

And turn to work without delay, 




For here 's a case will try our powers 

And all the skill we cou^nt as ours. 

The minutes let us now improve. 

This engine with its train must move, 

Or, failing this, express and freight 
And baggage must no longer wait. 
Though every Brownie, on his back, 
Shall carry to the town a pack." 
Some tried to dig the engine out 
From drifts that lay in heaps about. 
Though small the promise that the scheme 
Would end in furnace-fire or steam. 
But who can gage or understand 
The power of a mystic hand 
14 




Don't be afraiil, liow- 

ever grand, 
To do tlie task with 

vour o\\ii hand. 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 



That is not bound by mortal line 
Or limit that its acts confine ? 

A shovel little wonder 

brings 
When in the human hand 

it swings, 
But in a Brownie's hand — 

ah me! 
A ditteient touch — and — go 

we see, 




And snow-plows, rotary or straight. 
Surpass it only in their weight. 
15 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 



But all were not with drifts content, 
For some to freight and baggage bent, 



Determined, if 
no wheel 
would start, 




They gathered from the cars with speed 
What every town is apt to need. 

Especially that time of year 
When feasts and presents 
should appear, — 
Supplies to fill the 

pantry shelf. 
And toys to make one 
hug himself, 
The pussy-cat, the horse 

and cart. 
The jvunping-jack, 

that makes one 
start, 




THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 



The evergreens in bundles all 

Tied up with care for home and hall, 

Some towering high, some small in size, 

But all to give a glad surprise, 

And bring the clap of childish hand. 

And wonder at the scene so grand ; 




The pig, presented as a gift, 

To give some farmer friend a lift. 

And proving, by his plaintiff squeals, 

'T was rather long between his meals. 




'T is strange," 
said one, "what 
things you 
find 



In cars filled by the human kind ; 



17 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 




■i/ 





Potatoes from Bermuda brought, 
And fish around Newfoundland caught, 
The broken tackle showing plain 
Their elders' lessons were in vain." 

Some things came loose 
when boxes tipped 
That for menageries 
7v were shipped, 

^^/v^ And, for a moment, 

it seemed plain 

That panic would a foothold gain ; 
And it took courage of the best 
To shove things back into the nest. 
For some have daring that will rise 
Superior to the shock that tries, 
And, as a tonic, give a brace 
To others threatened with disgrace. 



The broth may be all 
one could wish 

But careless souls up- 
set the dish. 





Said one, "We sometimes reach a scene 
Where horrors stare, mtli naught between, 
As if to test the spirit strong 
That to a Brownie should belong ; 
18 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 



And though some stagger, 
We 're equal to the 



in the main 

greatest strain." 




It looks as though whatever grew 
In Africa, and India, too. 
In way of reptile, beast or fowl 
Was there to hiss and scream, and howl, 

Brought from a tropic clime, a few 

Were to the zero weather new, 




To nothing say of freaks at hand 
That prosper in our native land. 

And, sluggish from the wintry air, 

Made little stir or trouble there. 



19 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 





While others, roused 
and stuffed 

with ire, 
Seemed full of action 

as of fire. 



Fine fruit was there brought many miles 
In vessels from far distant isles. 
And it went hard, in all their haste, 
To pass it on without a taste. 




Though ere the task was done, in truth, 
Or things beyond the reach of tooth, 



20 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 





Some had a better knowledge won 
Of fruit that felt the tropic sun. 




If labor with delight 

proceeds 
Then little sympathy 

one needs. 



'T is well," said one, 
"the night is long 
Till sounds the cheerful 
breakfast gong, 
For Brownie hands have 

much to do 
Before our heavy job is through. 
The work, as old traditions tell. 
That we begin, we finish well; 
21 



THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 



The time seems fitted to the task, 

And nothing more could Bro^^'llies ask." 




So box and bmidle, crate and can, 
Were moved according to their plan. 




While in the drifts the engine stood 
And would not move for bad or good, 
No bell in front, no "toot" behind. 
Gave warning of a change of mmd. 

22 




THE BROWNIES AND THE STALLED TRAIN. 

But at their task 
the Brownies 
kept, 
And moved 
the goods 
while 
people 
slept, 

Till in the station, safely piled, 
With creatures of the wood and wild, 





The merchandise of every name 
Was ready for the owners' claim. 




23 




^v^^^?>r^ 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM 



A 



S Brownies talked in spirits good, 

Beside a broken dam "they stood, 

To watch the water as it flew 

From many holes the timbers through. 

Said one: "The noise that strikes the ear 

"Would tell that something 's lacking here. 

If one had not an eye to see 

The water spouting out so free ; 

It surely finds no lack of room 
To make escape without the flume, 
Where it 's supposed 

to lie and wait 
AVith patience till they 

raise the gate." 
Another said : ^ ' This 

dam supplied 
The needs of all the 
country wide; 
24 




'T is not enough to 

laws obey, 
You must do more, or 

lose your way. 




THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



It drove the millstone 

round about, 
And ground the grain 

that kej)t folk stout 










y.^ --'^ <^ 3^'- >:,''■ :-^'^-ti.^,?^^^^^ / 



pAi.'^eH'- 



From Grandsire, with his gruel bowl, 
To Baby, learning how to roll. 
It made the saw play up and dowTi, 
And furnish lumber for the town 
25 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 




To build its homes so 

snug and warm, 
And give protection 

from the storm." 
A third exclaimed : 
"Now here 's 
a task 
That will have all 
that one 

could ask, 

Who seeks distinction to attain, 
In way of struggle and of strain ! 
And I, for one, don 't want to miss 
Or put aside a chance like this. 
We all can see there 's danger here, . 
For even us, who never fear ; 
And, if a river talks at all, 
Quite jjlainly says this waterfall, 
'Begin, begin, to stop the leaks, 
You '11 need no other bath for weeks.' 




^fer-'-^S^'!^'^>fc^;''"!Sl^ 



But where the 
human kind 
would dread 

To make a move, 
we push ahead, 

And in this way 
the honor win 

That only comes 
from wading in. 



26 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



If men with chisel, saw, 

and bore, 
Could patch this break, 

we can do more, 




Because their skill is ours, too, 
Besides some gifts they never knew." 
What need we, with our Imowledge great 
Of Brownie band, do more than state 
The task was soon coimiienced with zest, 
And every member did his best. 



27 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 

The work begun was work indeed, 
Of all tlieir strength they felt the need, 
Of skill to plan, and power to stick 
Or make a leap both sure 
and quick, 




For water, if there be enough 
And running fast, is dangerous stuff. 
And those who went above the flow 
Were not more safe than those below. 
28 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



'T was hard above to cheek the rush, 
And hard below to meet the gush ; 
And some were troubled by the fish 
That at tlie moment had a wish 





What's art or skill 
unless employed 

In some good way, 
where work's en- 
joyed ? 



To take advantage of the flow 

To reach the ocean miles below^ ; 

If pleasure had been their intent, 

Instead of patching up a rent, 

They would have foimd the fishing fine 

Without the aid of hook or line. 

The logs, that down the stream they ran 

To aid in working out their plan. 

Were seldom checked at boom or bar 

And, to their sorrow, went too far. 

While BrowTiies with the sticks were tossed, 

And for a time were counted lost. 

For logs rolled over as they ran. 

And changed at once the Brownies' plan, 

By keeping heads a foot below 

Where it was thought the feet would go. 
29 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 

Some might have laughed who saw the sight, 
But there 's no fun in such a plight. 
Some bravely faced the danger great, 
While more went backward to their fate. 
And on the timbers round or square 
That they had shaped with art and care, 




There was no moment, do their best, 
When one could let his prudence rest. 



30 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



'T would have been painful to behold 
If one knew not traditions old, 




That Bro\^iiie i^eople can win through 
The trials that would us undo. 
There is no mourning at the home 
When they lose breath beneath the foam, 
Or grievmg at the fireplace, 
If they are missing for a space. 
They 're up and active as a clock 
Nor ever suffer from the shock, 
Or they would not for years have run 
From page to page as they have done. 
A mortal scarce can comprehend 
The energ}^ the}' all expend 
31 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 




To cany out their plans entire, 
That faihire may not mock desire. 
Like bees in hive, or ants m hill, 
They show a common stir and will, 
Aiid though at times they crowded seem, 
They 're only working out their scheme, 
Each calculation made aright 
To reach success and honor bright ; 
If one should judge them ere they 're through, 
While all 's confusion and to do. 
You 'd think success would never crown 
Such crazy acts, or bring renown. 
At such a time advice is lost. 
As all have plans and won't be bossed, 

But carry out as firm 

as stone 
The part each thinks 
to be his own. 
Strange things were into 

service press 'd 
That in their hurry 
promised best, 
And few the objects that escaped 
Their eyes, if they were rightly shaped, 
Or could with labor small be made 
To stop a leak if rightly laid. 
They used some gates that long had swung 
A welcome wide to old and young. 
But now were sagging in their place 
With faithless hinge and broken brace. 
32 




THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



The wooden troughs from pigs they drew 
Before their evening meal was through, 








And bore them off to stop a leak 

Ere morning showed a crimson streak, 

While disapproval, loud and shrill, 

Came from the swine that lost their swill. 

Escaping thus from pen and bars 
They followed, squealing to the stars. 
For pigs, however ill they feel 
Are never known to miss a meal. 
No doubt it gave the Brownies pain. 
To hear the creatures squeal in vain, 
For still they harbor feelings fine. 
With due regard for even swuie, 
33 




THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 




But their demand for wood was great, 
And little timber blessed the State, 
The band, besides, had not the ]30wer 
To fell the trees ; within that hour 
And so, in spite of all the din, 
The piggy's patent trough went in. 
The task was hard, and tried the best. 
And all were anxious for a rest, 
But that was not the place to stay 
And face the coming glare of day. 

The work might show, as show it did 

Ere hand could move or tongue forbid. 

While men were dreaming of their spoil 

The active sprites pursued their toil, 

And caused surprise extending wide 

Around the country every side, 

The people gathered, as they will. 

When rumors every section till. 

Each farmer something seemed to sj^y 

That looked familiar to his e3'e, 

But how it got beneath the flood, 

Supporting stones/^ ^.^^s^jj^or stopping mud 






34 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 

Was more than men could well make out 

However long they stayed about. 

But grain was sowed, and corn was hoed, 

And harvest in the barn was stowed, 

And still the story of the way 

That dam was patched, 'tween day and day, 

Could neither satisfy nor tire 

The listener by the gate or fire. 




So those who still had strength to spare 
To weaker comi'ades gave their care, 
For some were heated, some were chilled. 
And some with aches and pains were filled, 
35 



THE BROWNIES MEND THE DAM. 



While more had bruises, or were sore 
With work they never tried before ; 
The Brownies, when they aid a friend, 
No conmionplace assistance lend. 
To share one's burden and his grief 
Is counted comfort and relief, 
But when the Brownies have a chance 
They make a more humane advance, 
And in their zeal to serve an elf 
Take up his troul^le and himself. 
They all were glad to bring a close 
To work, before the people rose. 
They hastened to a safe retreat 
Where no surj^rises they would meet, 
However bright the day might be. 
Or mortals hope to find the key. 




If you are faithful at 

your task, 
Time will grant you 

what vou ask. 




36 





THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING 



WAS a season wet that tried 
J The farmers' patience far and wide, 
The hay was fine but rain too free 
Fell from each cloud that left the sea, 
Till people sat inside the door 
And watched their meadows flooding o 'er. 
When Bro^^Tiies, passing through at dark, 
The sad condition paused to mark. 
Within the margin 

of a wood. 
That crowned a peak, 

the Brownies stood. 
The old without a pant 

or puff 
Climbed up the hill 
though steep 
and rough. 




THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 



They do their part 

m every scheme 
well as those 

who younger seem, 
For time makes small 
inroad, ^Ye find, 

Upon a Brownie's 
frame or 
mind, 




Though mortals may grow old and lame, 

The Brownies will remain the same. 
38 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 




The dullest cloud 
that 's o'er us 

whirled 
May have a fire could 

light the world. 



Said one: "To-day was fairly bright, 
The sun got in its touch all right, 
And hay that 's lying round us now 
Would look far better in the mow ; 
Especially this piece, I 'm sure. 
Owned by a farmer old and poor. 
If this is lost to him, good-by 
To half his winter months' supply! 
There will be bellowing in the stall 
When hunger waits the famier's call, 
If rick and manger lack the hay 
The beasts have waited for all day. 
Now who is ready to begin 
To help and put this fodder in?" 
Another said, "Not here alone 
You '11 work where goodness 

should be shown. 
For everyone can see 

with you 
Where duty lies, and 
what 's to do." 
The midnight pleasures 
they had plamied, 
Before they reached 

this piece of land, 

Were for the time put out of mind 
And head and hand to work inclined. 
Some knew how forks felt in the hands. 
Had handled rakes in other lands, 
39 




THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 







Some eould in bundles 

roll the hay, 
Until great forkfuls 

waiting lay, 
AYliile more could pitch 

to any height 
And others build 

the load aright. 
On carts they did not 

all dej^end, 
But everything that 

heljJ could lend 




Was pressed that night to do its share, 
Till many stalls were empty there. 
A supernatural gift can bring 
Muscles to break the strongest thing, 
And snaiDping ash or maple round 
Was on the field a eomnion 

sound. 
But what 's 
a broken tine 
or tooth. 
Or even 
splintered 
head forsooth. 
When some black —^^^ . -^ 

cloud is swinging near ^^ "^^ 

Intent on drenching every spear % 
Some forks gave out beneath the weight 
And rakes were brought to ruin 's gate. 

40 




THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 



The wheels and axles 
creaked in pain 

And of their burden 
did coini^lain, 







Till some old spokes thought it was just 
And proper to betray their trust, 
And it took coaxing on the part 
Of Brownies to keep up their heart. 
A little sprinkle threatening more, 
The workers feared a great downpour, 



41 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYJIAKIXG. 




And ue'er was hay put out 

of sight 
In barns so quickly as 

that night, — 
Pile after i:)ile, loacl 

after load, 
Was carted down the 

muddy road. 
One Brownie said, "My 

load was Imilt 



In proper shape, but got a tilt 
Which changed the nature and the plan 
When o'er that pile of stones we ran. 
'T is hard enough to build, you know. 
On level ground, while on you go ; 
But harder still for 
man or sprite 
When climbing over 
all ui sight." 
Some ran through 
puddles in 
the road 
Where wheels were 
hid beneath 
the load, 
Sunk deep in mud 

and sticky clay 







But safe and dry they kept the hay. 
Said one, "We can't save all the crop 
In the short time we have to stop, 
42 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 



Or that the beasts, ere winter 's by, 
Will wish had reached the manger dry. 



,/:,;,|t>c'-^-;^- 








But that to which our efforts bend 
Will count for something in the end. 
A little here, a little there, 
Is better than a hay-mow bare." 
If farmers could such servants find 
To keep their interests in mind, 
And work till tired enough to drop, 
To save from harm a threatened crop, 
43 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 

With one consent and one desire, 
From business they could soon retire. 
To try and keep the hay in place 
Around the load some had to race, 
And with the forks and rakes applied 
Kept careful guard on every side ; 




/'ali^eh core 



While more, to keep it packed and press 'd, 
Upon the load found place to rest, 
And while performing service good 
Enjoyed the ride as well they could. 
But had there been more stakes to which 
They could have clung when came a pitch, 

44 



THE BROWNIES AT PIAYMAKING. 



There might have 
been more 
tmie for 
play 
Aiid less alarm 
along the 
way. 
Some blocked the 
doors with 
loads below 
That took up 
time to 

safely stow, 
But openings in 
the roof 
they made 
So that the work 
was not 
delayed. 
And at the top 
or on the 
floor 
Each hand its share 
of labor bore. 
^ .\^ The barns were 
k'NlM filled ere rise of sun, 
ijK'Wf "When morning broke 
'^i-wenc*' ^^-^g ^^g]^ ^^g done. 

With ardor that brooked no restraint, 
And harmony, would please a saint, 
45 








THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKIXC. 



They raked the fields, and 

cleaned the road, 
And horses first a 

weakness showed. 
It took a pressure 

all around 
To shut the doors as 

the,y were found. 
The boards were sprung, 

and nails were vain 
To close the openings 

made by strain. 
It took some work to 

run and race 
And put things back 

in proper place; 





If they had time repairs to do, 
Thej^ would have left things good as new, 
But in the sky the broadening light 
Was waiting not for man or sprite. 

So Brownies with 

a conscience clean 
Made haste to leave 
the rural scene. 
And when the sun with 

rays of gold 
Proved all was true 

the dawn had told, 
Where were the Brownies' 
Nowhere near. 




46 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 




When tasks are done they disappear. 
The flooded plain or mountain land 
Is not a barrier to the band. 

47 



THE BROWNIES AT HAYMAKING. 



They disappear, and those who kuow 
The most about them cannot show 
Their hiding place, or where they rest, 
But wait their coming, which is best. 

The wondering farmer never knew 

Who Ixuidled up his hay, and drew 

So well across the sods and stones 

The loads that shook the Brownies' bones. 

For elf-bands leave no mark behind 

To satisfy the curious mind. 

But sweating beasts that did their share 
Knew well no common folk were there. 
And will in mind review that night 
When months and years have taken flight. 
If they could talk, or thoughts exchange. 
As round the field they graze or range, 
They 'd tell of things that they have seen. 
And manv a marvel that has been. 




The work well done 
speaks for itself, 

It fills the bin, and 
crowds the shelf. 




48 




THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD 




f^^ T dusk as they were passing by, 

J The band a village chanced to spy; 
The town itself was well enough 
And nestled by a wooded bluff, 
But when the railroad was surveyed, 
In order to avoid a grade, 
And thus insure a speedy trip 
They almost gave the place the slip, 
Thinking 't would make 
their business pay 
To place the track some 

miles away. 
Said one, as he glanced 

o'er the space 
Between the station and 
the place, 

49 




THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 

"We 're here to aid the hTiman kind, 
To uote the want, to ease the mind. 
The more we serve, believe me still, 
The better we onr mission fill." 









irn^WTw 5 







pAuiei{ cox- 



':;'\'-M>»^^^"'^;:tu 



Another said, "Ri,a,ht well I know 
What 's in your mind. We '11 not be slow 
50 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 



To act upon the liint so bright 

And move the railroad track to-night. 

I know their business through and through — 

There 's not a train till morning due, 



U=W 




Our mystic jjower will help us out, 
We '11 change the whole concern about, 

51 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 



We '11 lift the track so straight ahead, 

And make a sweeping curve instead, 

Of grade we '11 take bnt little heed 

But move the ties and rails with speed, 
The signals and the 

switches lift 
And re-arrange to 

suit the shift, 
We '11 make the track rest 

where it should, 
Near by the to^\^l 

for service good. 
Who wants to run 

a mile at least 
To catch a train 

if going easf? 




THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 



Who wants to clioke aud 

puff his best 
Then lose his train, 

when going west? 











A failure may, as 

some contend, 
Turn out a blessing in 

the end. 



Before the sun looks o'er yon. hill, 

Where pine and spruce are growing still, 

We '11 work a change, and make a move 

That will to all a blessing prove." 

We 're not prepared with time, or strength, 

To give each separate act at length. 

Enough to say that shovels flew. 

That picks were plied, that spikes they drew. 

The rails were bent and newly laid 

And some attention paid to grade. 



53 



THE BROWNIES AND THE EAILROAD. 




Though certain things 
they liad to slight 
To finish all ere 

morning light. 
One spike was made 
to serve for two, 
The ]>roken pick was 
forced to do, 
While ever}' signal disk and switch, 
Were made to work without a hitch, 
54 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 



As they could hardly chances take 
With such as these, for safety 
Said one, "When wal- 
ls under way 
Some tracks are laid 

without dela,v, 
When armies make 

a hasty move. 
Their chance of victory 

to improve; 
But, in the piping 

time of peace, 
Plain joeople's comfort 

to increase, 
Not often is track- 

la^'ing done 
Between the set and 

rise of sun." 
They moved the railroad 

crossing sign 
And switch, to suit their 

own design, 
And that was far more 

work than play, 
For railroad men make 

things to stay 
And don't expect a change 

to make 
Unless their interest 
is at stake. 




55 



THE liUOW.MES AM) THE RAILKOAU. 



They changed the signal 

boards that clear 
Directions give the 



engineer 




<^.^.^^^^^^^^^_^ 



And each Avas willing 

to improve, 
To lend a hand, to 

shove or move. 
A busy half hour's time 

was spent 
In moving wires that 

danger meant. 
For all with currents 

strong were charged. 
Which nuifh the Brownies' 

risk enlarged; 



-0^ 



Just where to 
toot, slow up, 
or l)ide, 
Or where to pull 
the throttle 
wide. 
To some the work 
was strange 
and new, 
But all were 
there to 
l)uckle to. 




56 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 




At times a tumble to 

the ground 
Would seem to bring 

the stars around, 
But it must be 

a quick affair 
That takes a Brownie 

unaware, 
And though some plans 

were broken through 
No injury befell the 

crew. 
A person might forego 

his sleep, 
Without a sigh, to gain 

a peep 
At that most interesting 

band 
With such a job as this 

on hand. 
There 's much to do that 

must be right. 
There 's little that can 

bear a slight. 
But with the Brownies 

at the task 
No other guarantee 

we ask. 



'T was fortimate no iron span 
Or wooden bridge was in the plan ; 
57 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 



A culvert, and a pipe 

or two 
To let the water ripple 

tliroHgli, 
Was all they found to 

cause delay 
Except a bed of sand 

and clay. 

And as the stars 

made their 

escape, 

The cvirve took 

on a better 

shajoe, 

A hand-car was 

in service brought 
On which a number passage sought, 






THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 

As back and f ortli along the line 
They carried on their bold design. 
And by the time the da^^^l began 
To crowd itself on drowsy man, 
And early birds commenced to sing, 
The railroad was a finished thing. 




So folks could step forth from the door 
Of private home, hotel, or store, 
And take the train at leisure there 
And still have time and breath to spare. 



When next the train came down that way 
There was some doubt, if not dismay. 
When no familiar points were seen. 
For which the eye is ever keen. 
59 



THE BROWNIES AND THE RAILROAD. 




'T is not the weight of 

flesh or bone 
That makes the man, 

or s])rite. alone. 



With hands upon the wheel in di'ead 

The brakeman's eyes stood from his head, 

The poor conductor, rattled more, 

Was punching tickets o'er and o'er. 

The engineer, who thought he knew 

The road as well as I know a'ou, 

Was puzzled much to fuid so great 

A curve where all had been so straight. 

He blew the whistle, strained his eyes, 

Put on the brakes in great surprise, 

Shut off the steam, and was about 
Upon the point of jimiping out. 
Believing in his heart it led 
To some deep ditch or river bed ! 
But when it stopped, as he could see, 
Close to the town where it should be, 
He hardly knew what should be done, 
Stay in the cab, or jump and run. 
The company, of course, were wild. 
And blamed the town, and papers filed 
And would have gone to law, no doubt. 
If they had proof to help them out ; 

But having nothing of the kind 

They very Avisely changed their mind — 

For there was mystery, that few 

If any, could see fairly through ; 

And so the bags of mail were dropped 

And baggage where the train had stopped, 

And then the station was moved dowu 

And stands to-day beside the town. 

60 




Wlio cares what 's seen 
upon Mars' crust. 

Canals or caves? 

Earth claims our 
dust. 




mmmm^mm 




THE BROWNIES AID THE 
EXPEDITION 




Oft sailors fall a prey 

indeed, 
To sharks on land no 

sea could breed. 



HE Brownies stood upon the pier 
Where lay a ship for half a year, 
Waiting repairs and funds to send 
It to the earth's remotest end, 
Some unkno'wn seas, perhaps, to strike 
Or find out what the pole is like. 
The hull was sound, 

the greater part. 
Although some planks 

began to start, 
The yards were up of 

timber tough. 
Some ropes there were, 

but not enough. 
She had a fair supply 

of spars. 
Her masts were pointing at the stars, 
61 




THE BROV\T>riES AID THE EXPEDITION. 



But tilings above and things belo^Y 
Were wanting and the funds were low. 




Said one, "Tliis vessel which has rolled 
On many seas is growing old, 
While waiting to be rigged in shape 
To brave the dangers of the cape, 
62 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 




And push its way through ice and snow 

To gather facts the world should know." 

Another said, * ' Had we been near 

Some months ago she 'd not be here, 

But plowing through some wondrous sea. 

And well supplied as she should be. 

We '11 turn attention to the case 

And fit her out in shortest space. 

She '11 go out mth the morning tide 

With every missing want supplied. 
So put the mystic band to work, 
Such tasks the Brownies never shirk." 
Then up the lane and down the street 
To butcher shops in search of meat, 
To chandler shops, where things are found 
That ships require the world around. 

The busy Brownies quickly flew. 
What vessels need the band well knew 



In storms at sea, small 
gifts seem great, 

An oar is worth a 
whole estate. 




For they were cruising all about 
Ere you were born, I have no doubt. 

63 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 



They took the anchor up with care 
In sections, and all bore their share, 

And soon on l)oard each fluke 
and shank 

And bar in its position sank, 




Till it was ready to 

take hold 
And save the ship when 

breakers rolled. 
"The ship," cried one, 
"may be too weak. 
And strain its ribs, 

and spring a leak, 
And in that case a pump 

or two 
"Will be of value to the crew. 




64 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 




While storms are raging far from land, 
Supplies like these come well in hand, 




Where every stroke may save a life 
And bring one home to child or wife, 
To nothing say of cargo great 
Brought into port in perfect state." 
Provisions of the choicest kind 
That store could yield, or seekers find. 
Were put away for that round trip 
Where storms w^ould long delay the ship, 
65 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 




And sailors must have 

strengthening food— 
The best there was, 

was none too good. 
Some carried fish but 

newly caught 
While other bags and 

barrels brought 
And salted down the 

2)lenteous catch 
"NMiich soon was stowed 

below the hatch. 



While some the casks 

and cases rolled 
Around the deck, or 

down the hold. 
Some in the rigging 

crawled about 
To take things in, or 

let things out. 
For only those who 

canvas spread 
Had any business 

overhead. 





Some found their work among the spars, 
And some brought bedding for the tars. 
And more among the ropes seemed lost 
That must be had at any cost. 
The binnacle and compass cased, 
In which the sailor's trust is placed, 
66 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 




Were hurried to their proper stand 
For those who shovild the ship command. 
They found a life-boat on the beach 
And dragged it through the streets to reach 





Tlie ship, witliout a splash or bend 
Of oar or paddle, to the end. 
Said one, ''They '11 want to go ashore 
To plant a mark, if nothing more. 
When they have reached their distant goal 
(Which is, no doubt, the frozen pole) , 
67 



THE BRO\^^SrIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 

So tliey can prove in later days 

They reached the point and won the praise." 





The hermit-crab, 

usurper fell, 
From weaker creatures 
takes the shell. 



"Perhaps," said one, "mosquitoes tliere 

May revel in the frosty air. 

Unlike our OA^ai, and hreed and thrive 

Through every change and keep alive. 

Now some fine netting should be found 
In case the pests should swarm around." 
Another cried, "Some spears may be 
Of service in that icy sea ; 
Then if a fish is slow to rise 
The crew may spear him where he lies. 
And naught should go without a test 
For navigators earn the best; 
The very best that 's in the store 
This shijD shall bear away from shore." 
Another said, who ^dewed the scene 
And what was crowded decks between, 
68 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 



"We can't go with them South or North 
But well supplied they sally forth — 
Of that we '11 make no sad mistake 
While there 's abundance we can take." 

To put on paper all that went 

Between the decks with good intent, 

Would tax the pen and 
ink, and strain 

The most receptive eye 
and brain. 






Be careful of the 
Brownie band 

They'll have the Na- 
tion vet in hand. 



The bread, the fish, smoked or in brine, 
The plummets, and the fathom line. 
The tools to mend the careless break. 
The cures for pain and stomach ache, 
Were carried on, or quickly rolled 
Into their places in the hold. 
The gangway was a lively show 
With everything upon the go. 
Some Brownies lost their loads, of course, 
For those behind pushed with some force, 
69 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 



And those not ready to defend 
Themselves could no assistance lend. 
In other ways misfortune showed, 
When casks gave out, and liquid flowed. 




But though the Brownies did their best 
The stars were sinking in the west. 
First Saturn bade the rogues good-night, 
Gave one long stare, and slipped from sight ; 

And next the Twins looked on awhile. 

And could not pass without a smile ; 

It looked as if Orion shook 

His club, and his departure took ; 

The dog-star seemed to yelp aloud 

Then ran to hide behind a cloud ; 

And all the stars grew indistinct 

For at that moment Venus winked. 

Then slow but sure the sky grew bare 

And left the Brownies struggling there. 




Said one, "The rising of the sun 
Is very near, but we are done. 

70 



If \vp eonld analyze 

inaiikiiifl 
Perhaps some worthy 

traits we' d find. 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 




I would not be afraid, ' ' said he, 
' ' To take my chances on the sea 
Upon a ship with half the load 
Of food that on this boat is stowed, 
71 



THE BROWNIES AID THE EXPEDITION. 

The captain now could pipe liis ci-ew 
Upon the deck, if all he knew, 
Each take his station fore and aft, 
Shake out the canvas on the craft. 
Cast off the line, then catch the breeze. 
And point her prow for unknown seas. 
To wonders seek and glories find 
And facts to benefit mankind." 
The elf -band did not linger round 
To learn what seas the ship had found, 

Nor wait until reports 




When seas are rough, 
the sinner prays, 

When seas are smooth, 
his cards he phiys. 




4^ 



had trailed 
Back to the port from 

which she sailed. 
For other business 

seemed to spring 
Each night and fresher 

duties bring. 
And they were doubtless 

far away 
Before tlie ship had 

left the bay. 



Thus Brownies give good folk a start, 
Then let them carry out their part, 
Leaving a thousand hints behind 
To teach wise lessons to mankind. 




72 





THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP 



SUMMER sun had dropped to rest 
Behind the mountains in the west, 
And one by one the stars aglow 
Began to bold and bolder grow. 
And seemed alert to catch the eye 
Of those who eared to view the sky, 
As Brownies climbed upon a rock 
And gazed upon 

a grazing flock; 
And made remarks, 

as Brownies will. 
About their treatment, 

good or ill. 
Said one, "A great 
neglect is there, 
And shameful lack of 
proper care 

73 




THE BRO\^'XIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



Though summer heat is at its height, 
These wretched sheep must bear to-uight 

ftliiB 




T" i fir r 






^ (11/ 







^^mi&i 



'^*>~t^'*'-^' 



/Mi/-) £(5 cox 



A weight of wool would keep them warm 
Throughout the winter's hitterest storm." 
Another said, "Leave it to me 
To cure the evil all can see ; 
I know a place where shears are kept, 
(I 've even seen tliem since I slept), 
74 



THE BRO\^'NIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



Some new, some old, but all indeed, 
In proper shape to serve our need. 
We can do much before the glow 
Of morning, as we Brownies know. 
We '11 get the shears this very eve 
And give relief before we leave." 








•■ 1^. 






Some ran for ropes, and others went 
For shears that all might be content, 
And have a chance some work to do, 

Although to most, the 

task was new. 
The night was dark 

and it was foimd 
An aid to have some 
lights around, 




', a5_^ ■-•».— c—^ •j^ 



^ 



75 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



So lanterns played 

a brilliant part 
And did good service 

at the start. 
Some volunteered 

instruction kind 
To those who 'd surely 

trouble find, 
When sheep would 

struggle for 
release 
Before the}' parted 

from their fleece. 
Think you there was 

a long delay 




--■^iifc..^^,"."' 



Before the work was under way? 
Think you the stars, so apt to wink, 
Found nothing strange at which to blink? 

Had you been there 
with second sight 
You would have stared, 

as well, that night. 
According to the 
shearer's plan, 
To catch the sheep, 
they first began, 
But flocks, however 
much they may 
_ Need clipping close, still 

,0^./^.- -^- W.^...^. [ ^^,^^^ ^^Q^j. ^j^y^ 

76 




THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 





And lanterns will not always draw 

A creature round that knows no law, 

The rattling, and the flood of light, 
Uniting caused a general fright. 
In truth it was enough to make 
The flock their native hills forsake, 
To ford the stream, or leap the gate, 
That kept them from a neighhormg State. 
And Brownies felt they could not let 
Their well-laid plans be so upset, 



77 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 

And SO some sheep lost half their fleece 
Before they settled down in peace. 





'Tis not an easy task, indeed, 
To catch a sheep which runs with speed ; 
The mountain goat has got a name 
For bounding fast, when sought as game, 
And Brownies found each woolly beast 
Was cousin to the goat, at least. 
And even closer ties might trace 
Before they finished with the chase. 
Of course the work to some was new 
Who came from lands where flocks were few, 
78 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 




Who hardly could the fact declare 
If sheep, indeed, grew wool or hair, 
Or whether it was right or wrong 
To wear it all the sunmier long ; 
But short the school the BroA\aiies need 
To learn the way they should proceed 
The task of some was but to bring 
The creatures up by strap or string 







:z^- 






To those more fit to handle shears, 
Or those who liest could calm their fears. 
79 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 




If Satan had a score 

of wings 
He couldn't answer all 

the rings. 



But some old rams soon made it known, 

That they had notions of their own, 

And were content to worry througii 

The heat another month or tw(\ 

Much rather than let sprites like these 

Hold them an hour between their knees. 

To pull and roll and clip from hide 

The coat that nature does provide. 

Some sheep escaped and time improved, 

Before the fleece was all removed, 

And Brownies had a lively run 

To finish work but partly done. 

It chanced some rams were cross and strong, 
Whose heads Avere hard, and horns were long. 
And they caused trouble more or less 
And bawled with anger and distress, 
While tunid sprites stood to one side 
Fearing the rams that stamjoed in pride, 
Denied the battle and the sport 
That entertained the braver sort. 

But even rams for all their rage 

And twisted horns, that told their age. 

In spite of anger, strength, and years. 

Were brought in time beneath the shears ; 

For when such mystic powers combine 

'T is best all effort to resign. 

And realize one must submit 

Till work is done, and Brownies quit. 

'T was clipping here, and clipping there. 

And rolling over everywhere, 

80 





THK BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



Turning and twisting round to feel 
The pressure of the busy steel; 
Now head below, 

and heels upright ::^.J^ 

And next the shaking 
tail in sight; 





What 's war but set- 
ting matters right, 

That could be fixed 
before the fight? 



And ere the creature rightly knew 
What all this meant, the job was through, 
And bare it ran, the grass to find. 
But left its woolly coat behind. 
One Brownie said, "There 's quite a knack 
In keeping sheep upon the back 
With feet in air for half the night 
Still pointing at the planets bright. 
But thanks to charms that we can use, 
Compliance seldom they refuse, 
So thus the work is light and fast 
And we accomplish wonders vast." 
The mystic touch, the mystic twist 
81 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



That dwells in every Brownie's wrist, 
Was far too much for conmion sheep 
To understand, however deep, 
And soon a passive heap they lay 
And let the Brownies have their way. 




fM^^^m^'^^''''t^^ '^'i -^ 



AVell, you and I, who something know 
Of how they worked long years ago, 
82 



THE BROWNIES SHEARING SHEEP. 



Can judge how time was valued dear 
By Brownies, when the way was clear. 

They piled the fleece upon the ground, 

Or rolled it up, as chance 
was found, 




^/V 







Who deepest digs, the 

borer tells, 
Will surely drain all 

shallower wells. 



Upon the rocks or hillocks nig-h 
Where it would catch the shepherd's eye, 
And prompt attention might receive, 
After the elf -band took its leave. 

And what the shepherd said that morn, 
When he perceived his sheep were shorn ; 
Or what he thought, when from his rock 
He cast his eyes upon the flock. 
And counted heads and found that all 
Were there to answ^er to his call, 
83 



THE BROV^TSriES SHEARING SHEEP. 



We '11 never know, for Brownies fled, 

When morning in the sky Avas red. 

The sheep were bare, and bleating fast. 

As if to tell through what the^^ pass'd. 

What could he say? What could he do. 

But call for aid ? and feebly, too, 

For fear was shaking both his knees. 

His conscience sure was ill at ease. 

And as the}'' gathered up the wool 

That lay in heaps or wagonsf ul 

Upon the grass, arranged with care, 
Or laid apart for sim and air. 
Said he, "There were strange doings here 
While we were sleeping soundly near. 
And though there 's not a sight or sound 
Of BroA\aiies, they have been around." 




The master's eye, if 

well applied, 
Will keep his treasure 

chest supplied. 




84 





THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED 
VILLAGE 



DAYLIGHT closed as BrowTiies found 
A village burned quite to the ground ; 
A cottage here, a pile of wood, 
A gate or fence were all thai stood; 
And people scattered here and there 
Received a friend's or neighbor's care. 
When Brownies came, the scene was bad, 
And every face was more than sad, 
As the}^ beheld the depth of woe 
An hour or two of flame can show. 
Said one, "The fort down by the shore 
Has many army tents in store; 

85 




THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



They have been kept from 
sun and rain 
Since soldiers camped 
^.'^^'^fiT upon the plain. 




The holes in some, exposed to view, 
Show where the bullets whistled through, 
And tell that near the line of fight 
The}' took the volleys left and right." 

86 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 




"We '11 go to-night!" another cried, 

"And tents for homeless folk provide. 

We '11 carry all our arms can hold, 

And ask no leave from sentries bold. 

Let soldiers sleep, and take their rest. 

In time of peace it suits them best ; 

Their country's call may come once more. 

But till that summons, let them snore. 

What care we now for secret knock, 

For bayonet-point, or click of lock? 

We '11 pass the watchful sentry there, 

And leave him jabbing at the air; 

We '11 carry out the tents at will, 
Which guards believe in store-house still 
Tliey '11 know no more about our raid. 
Than if at home in bed we stayed. 
And so, with nothing left to fear, 
We '11 simply bring the canvas here, 

The tent-pins and the poles, as well, 

And put work through in shortest spell — 

For half the night as you may spy, 

By stars above, has passed us by. 

The will is ours to do the deed. 

The strength to serve us at our need, 

For when to act we are inclined. 

We ask no favors of mankind." 

How can we hide from sprites like these 

Who move unseen, and where they please, 

Know where you put your savings by. 

And where you keep your cake and pie ? 

87 




The grasping hand can 
cause more tears 

Than one that shakes 
a dozen spears. 




THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 




And if they chose to do you harm, 

The power they have, aud hold the ehami ; 

'T is w^ell they 're f riendh^, and employ 

Their power .to aid and not destroy, 

For what a Browmie wants, he gains 

In spite of locks, and bolts, and chains. 

To take a fort by day or night 

But seldom brings unmixed delight, 

And even Brownies were aware 

That danger might be lurking there. 

It was not long, we may believe, 
Until the band, not asking leave, 
Had reached the fort where tents were stored 
Since cruel war had sheathed the sword. 
Said one, "It was a painful sight 
To see the homeless people's plight; 
The children shivering in the storm, 
And wTapped in muslin far from warm." 
For glad w^ere parents to escape 
And save their babes in any shape ! 
Some said they kne-w (and so they did), 
The place a secret ditch w^as hid, 





THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



•rvv- 



:% 







/•■^Lf^^ff COA. 




The early bird may 
get the prize, 

Unless the worm is 
early wise. 



Which was the surest wa,y to win 

Into the fort and all within. 

Along the dark and secret lane 

That did away with climb or strain, 

The Brownies soon were crowding keen 
Beneath the vines and briars green, 
Disturbing creatures of the night 
That flapped away in heavy flight. 

Out came the pins, out came the poles. 
At different heights and different holes ; 
Out came the tents that showed what shot 
Had done in battles now forgot. 
And what a loading-up was there ! 
More than a back was fit to bear — 
89 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



Unless a person luul lieen told 
About the power Brownies hold 





Old weapons which had service seen 

Long years before for king, or queen, 

Or commonwealth, as it might be, 

Proved tempting in a high degree; 
And some no little jDleasure found 
Tn bearing such old relics 'round ; 
They took some battle-flags along, — 
Indeed, I do not think it wrong 
Because the banners needed air. 
If nothing more, in waj' of care. 
90 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



The band, along the country road, 
Moved, struggihig with their heavy load. 
A number took the lower grade. 
While more the higher ridge essayed ; 
And all were eager to 

be found 
The first upon the 

village ground. 







The birds of night were startled by 
The strange parade, and could but fly 
Around and 'round in hopes to gain 
The reason for tlie curious train. 
91 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 

Prom such a move it seemed but fan- 
To think that war was in the air ; 
A broken legion in full rout, 
Fleeing the foe, and tuckered out, 
Could hardly show a scene more wild 
Than did the band, as on they filed. 





To load the gun, or 
draw the blade, 

Is what gives tliou- 
sands to the spade. 



"There '11 be a stir," said one, "we know, 
Around the fort when bugles blow ; 
The call to arms will rmg out clear, 
While scattered troops are hurried near ; 
And guns, poked from embrasures dark, 
That shoot for miles and hit the mark. 
They '11 Avonder who, ^vithout alarm. 
Could take the tents, nor suffer harm. 
Suppose from this a war should spread, 
And shake the nation to its head!" 
92 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 

Soon ill the park, or village square, 
The sweeping blaze was forced to spare 
Because it offered nothing good 
To spread the flames, in paint or wood, 
The Brownies gathered and began 
To quickly carry out their plan. 




fid 



PALhiel^ QO^ 



Up went the poles on every side, 
And dowTi went pins in earth to hide ; 
Blow upon blow they dealt like rain 
With hands that rarely strike in vain. 
93 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



To spread the canvas for a roof, 

That should be strong and weather-proof, 




Gave great delight, and willing hands 
Were quick to answer all demands. 




When morning light crept 

o'er the lawn 
The tents were up, the 

Brownies gone. 
Be sure the elf-band 

did not wait 
To learn the sentries' 

sorry fate; 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



They 'd other duties 

to perform 
Than hearing tlie 

conunander storm 




Upon the liill, as they withdrew, 
Some glances back the BroAvnies threw, 
And smiled to see the pleasing show 
Of army tents spread out below. 
95 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 



They felt repaid, for they could boast 
Beneath was shelter for a host, 





Where aged folk and children small 
Could now find comfort, one and all. 
Unlike mankind that honors claim, 
And hate to bear their share of blame, 
The Brownies on each other threw 
The praise that to themselves was due. 
Congratulating, as they might, 
Their comrades on their work 
that night. 
96 



THE BROWNIES AND THE BURNED VILLAGE. 




They shook each other's hands in glee, 

While compliments were passing free. 

They said they envied not mankind, 

With all their gifts and arts 
combined, 

But were content to pass their days 

As Browaiies with their mystic ways. 

Next day the homeless ran to claim 

The tents, and marveled how they came ; 

And one remarked, when speech he found, 
"Perhaps the Brownies were around." 
The band had business otherwhere 
The night that followed that affair. 
But all with one accord believed 
That much distress they had relieved, 
And taught a lesson, which we fear 
Was wasted on the brigadier. 





97 









THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE 

BUILD a bridge from shore to shore 
Across a stream where waters pour 
In haste to mix their sparkling flow 
With ocean waves some miles below, 



Is not a task to waken fear 
Or questions in an engineer. 
Then why should doubt oppress a band 
"Who have all kinds of trades at hand, 
When they have in 
their heads 

a scheme 
To throw a bridge 
across the 

stream % 
Said one, as they stood 

by the place, 
And watched the water 

in its race, 

98 




THE BROWNIES BUILD A BKIDGE. 



"Not only for ourselves in haste, 
When wading fails to suit our taste, 
But for the people who must cross 
On slippery stones all green with moss, 
Will we erect from side to side 
A structure which will bridge the tide." 
Another said, "A year or two 
Ago a scheme like this 
fell through, 





But workmen left their things about 
To carry on the plan laid out. 
We '11 take the stuff from where it lies 
And build a bridge for a surprise. 
When in the mornmg people flock 
To cross the stream, they '11 have a shock. 
'T will be a joy to leave the log, 
The stone, and water to the frog, 
99 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 



And cross ui^on our airy way 
Without a cent of toll to pay." 




Material was near at liand 

Which was good fortune for the band, 

And soon a stream of Brownies flowed 

Both to and fro — some with a load, 

And more in haste to heed the cry 

Of those whose arms were piled too high. 

But willing hands 
are never slow 



And soon the bridge 
began to grow. 
Some in mid-air the 
birds surprised 
Swinging on ropes with 
hooks devised. 




100 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 




To make things safe, if that could be — 
'T was an exciting thmg to see ! 
Indeed a Brownie wdthout guy, 
Or safety hitch, or fixture nigh, 
Swinging and turning is, I say, 
A sight to take the Ijreath away. 
101 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 




At times a hammer, 

bolt, or bar 
Would slip and spread 

a panic far. 
Perhaps a wrench would 

rattle down 
And light upon 

a Brownie's crown, 
While bending at some 

labor there 
That called for all his 

time and care — 
Then skip half way 

the span across 
To splash into the 

stream, a loss. 
But work in air at 

risk of neck 
Does not the Brownie 

courage check. 
And in the mine or in 

the cloud. 
Of their condition they 

are proud. 
Said one, "There 's 

pleasure in 

the task 



That gives folks aid before they ask ; 
'T is well to keep an open eye 
To note a want or hardship nigh, 
102 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 




For iioiie can help from Brownies seek, 
And we must let our actions speak. 
So drive the bolt in overhead 
And turn the nut to tighter thread, 
We '11 give the people round a chance 
Across the swinging bridge to dance." 
103 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A I'.lUIXiE. 

But talk fell in with ringing stroke 
And turning wrench, and never broke 





Upliold tlic name of 

iiiiii who fails, 
Lest yours be wanting 

in the scales. 



Or checked the rush that was begun, 
And would keep up till all was done. 
And what the Browaiies build will stay 
In spite of winds that round it play, 
And whistle in the loudest key 
As they come rushing from the sea. 
It took long ropes, a pull, a heave 
With mystic hands, one may believe, 
To check the sinking or the drift, 
And sections to their stations lift. 
How rivets found their proper place. 
And so, too, every rod and brace, 
"Without mistake, or fuss or clatter, 
AVe '11 never know — Init that 's no matter. 
104 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 



Then S]3eed if ever was required 
To bring the finish they desired, 
Then blows were doubled, loads increased, 
And he did best who said the least. 
Some sections tumbled from the toj) 
And rod, and brace, together drop. 
And working tools — a perilous slip — 
That on the frame, still held their grip. 
And being steel, as now appears, 
Increased the Brownies' toil and fears. 




Work on Sunday and 

you'll gain 
Weeks of labor all in 

vain. 




'T was hard to swim against the tide 
With heavy pieces trailing wide, 
105 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 



And long enough to form a s})an 
Of great importance in the plan, 
At times these pieces would 

break loose 
And great confusion 

would produce — 
And none could tell 

where ruin ran 
Nor where it ended 

or began. 
The birds along the river's side 
Sat on the branches open-eyed; 
No sleep brought rest 

to beast or bird 
That watched the work, 

the clamor heard. 
If the}^ could talk or we aright 
Could read their thoughts 

't would give delight 
To learn just how opinions ran 
Among the furred and feather 

clan; 
Forgot were corn- 
fields, frogs, 
and peas, 
The mice, and 

snakes, and 

bumble-bees, 

The grubs, and bugs in wood or clay, 

And measuring worms that inch their way 

106 




l.^J(: (? 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 




The boat upset and left the crew 

Both drenched and frightened through and through, 

107 



THE BROWNIES BUILD A BRIDGE. 



The cargo sinking out of sight 

But added to their pain and fright. 

The worlv went faster towards the close 

And from the chaos order rose. 

Old plans were found that showed aright 

How certain sections should unite, 

And tasks proved easy that before 

Upon their time and patience wore. 

A barge was brought that played a part 

Most sorely needed from the start 

And midway out, with anchors down, 

Upon their efforts placed the crown, 

For work from there was pushed ahead 

That to a finish quickly led. 

Said one, between the stroke or strain, 
To those more given to complain, 
"AVhat though we toil, what though we run 
To aid mankind till rise of sun? 
If blessings come from friendly act 
They fit the better through the fact." 





108 




THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR 
THE VETERINARY 



\j^ 




WhgtpypV* gives a lift or start 
^ ^"^ To any enterprise or art, 

Seems to tlie Brownie's heli:)ful mind 
A cliance to benefit mankind. 
'T was evening and the shade grew deep ; 
The watchman on his post, asleep. 
Was drowsing, though the fine was high 
If he fell under public eye; 
The owl was hooting on the bough 
To call his mate to notice how 
The jolly moon began to spill 
Her radiance o'er the distant hill. 
When on the scene with faces bright 
The Brownies gathered for the night. 
They ^-owed the hours should not be lost 
In moping round, at any cost. 
Said one, "I noticed here to-day 
A cottage where an old horse lay 

109 




THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



Beside the road ; and it seems i^laiu 

She had been injured by a train ; 

The locomotive from the back 

Just grazed her as she crossed the track. ' ' 

Another said, "I saw the same 

When I passed by. She 's more than lame, 

And more than liniment she '11 need 

To bring her to her former speed. 

An aged couple own the cot, 

And sore misfortmie is their lot. 

It rests with us something to do 

To aid these old folks, 




f)assing through 




The latter stage of life, I hear, 
And sadly short of worldly gear. 

This broken creature which they ovm. 

Is little more than skin and bone — 



'"■AtMEl^ Co>: 



110 



THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



But still slie had the strength to haul 
Them to the store or market-stall, 
And when the bell on Sabbath day 
Called them to church to kneel and pray, 
It was a chance they oft improved, 
Hopmg their cares might be removed. 

Twin colts, besides, 
-^"V'^ ^ a nobby pair. 

Who at the time were 
standing there. 





(Without a fault, except a slack 

Idea of danger on the track,) 

Were injured also by the train. 

And suffered many a bruise and strain." 

"And that 's not all," another said, 
"Some pigs nearby had made their bed 
And in the crash, as now^ is knowTi, 
One lost some skin, one broke a bone ; 
And if the horse has need of care. 
The swine no less should get their share ; 
111 



THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



And if YOU listen, von can hear 

Their grants and squealings far and near. 





Let smiles spread wide 
until the frown 

Finds no place left to 
settle down. 



'T is not, we find, a common case, 

And plasters seem quite out of place. 

Some cuts we may with linen bind. 

But more is needed, you will find. 

'T is worse than scratches here or there, 

Or broken teeth, or loss of hair. 

Our magic j)ower we '11 have to give 
To help the womided creatures live. 
Some chickens, too, that sat in rows 
Upon the fence to seek rej^ose. 
Were hit by splinters, till the flock 
Were rendered heli^less by the shock. 
We '11 pick them up and take them do^^'n, 
As best we can, to yonder town, 



112 



THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



And leave them stationed there before 
The veterinary 's office-door; 




And let him work 

a day or two, 
And make the creatures 

good as new. 
He 's skilled, we hear, 

he treats the brain, 
The hoof, the hock, and 

heals the strain. 




They '11 be as safe beneath his hand 
As when within the barn they stand. 
113 



THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



He knows what liniments can do; 
And w^hat can start the hair anew; 
How to employ the splint, or cast 
To overcome the fracture fast; 
"VATiat apj)lications, thick or thin, 
Will start another coat of skin; 





Or what will bring the feathers fair 
Upon the fowl, though plucked so hare." 
By chance a clothes-line, stretching nigh, 
Of cotton furnished a supply, 

Which served for bandages and slings 
As well as could the proper things — 
For skill to tie, or tact to wind, 
Is not to mortal hands confined. 
First aid to injured man or beast 
Is knowdedge which should be increased. 
And Brownies, through their mystic ways. 
Give us examples w^orth our praise. 
114 



THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 





Then from the warehouse and the store 
All kinds of remedies thej^ bore, 
Sought out the shelves that might contain 
The liniments for break or strain, 
For loss of hair, and loss of hide, 
And plumage scattered far and wide. 
They took from those who could afford 
It best, supplies that had been stored — 
For greatest good in greatest need 
Is part and parcel of their creed. 

They handled all with heed, but still 

Mishaps occurred, as oft they will. 

For bottles, brittle at the best, 

Discharged themselves without request. 

And spread the liquid in demand 

Without the help of screw or hand. 

To move the caravan with care 

Was work that gave each one 



his share ; 




115 



THE BROWTSriES FIXD \YORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



But without jar to broken bone, 
Or injury, 

so far 
as 

known, 




The Brownies 
down the 
road 
and lane 
— Moved with 
the victims of 
tlie train ; 




They 're not above the hunil:)lest deeds 

They think the situation needs; 

One mind in all, one purpose strong, 

To all lend aid, to none do wrong. 

And nothing in the field or fold 

They turn from with indifterence cold. 

The burden may be great, indeed. 

It often is, as 

one can read, 

But that 's a matter 

counted 

slight 

By such strange 

elves as 

Brownies Ijright. 
116 




THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



Between the shafts some took their place 
Aiid buckled fast the strap, or trace ; 
While others to the wheel gave hand 
To urge it through the mud and sand 




For Brownies do the best they can, 
And shirk no toil in helping man. 
Said one, " 'T is well we work 

at night. 
For this would be a sorrv sight 



For nervous people, coming out 
Of doctor's offices about — 
The shock would siu^ely give them pain. 
Or aching head, or dizzy brain. 
And all the treatment and advice 
Would go for nothing in a trice; 
But we have nerves that do not shake 
With sights at which the others quake, 

117 




THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 




And will not let our senses go 
Because of an unsightly show. 
Distress, wherever it is fovind, 
Will spread no pleasing halo round, 
But we must do our part the same 
Or else forego the Brownie name." 
One trip did not suffice to bring 
The splintered bone or injured wing 
Of wretched creatures who had found 
A railroad bed was dangerous ground, 
And so repeated trips w^ere made 
Between the village and the grade, 
Where rushing wdieels disturbed the sleep 
Of beast and bird with rapid sw^eep. 
But scant respect the creatures paid, 
And showed resistance to their aid, 
For though intentions were the best 
That could inspire an elfin breast 
The creatures never had been taught 
The filler lines of human thought, 
And saw injustice sharp and full 
In every bandage, push and pull. 
And some, in fact, were strong of head 
Could not be coaxed, Avould not be led 
But took each touch or tumble there 
As something not upon the square. 

'Tw^as well they fell in Brownie hands 
At such a time, when such demands 
Were made on patience, skill and care 
And kind forbearance evei'A'^vhere. 
118 



tOCOMOTiVe. 




THE BROWNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



And seldom through the roughest deal 
Was there occasion for a squeal, 
Though bruised of leg, or sore of hide 
The petting methods were denied 
"When beasts ran counter to their aim 
And thus incurred the weight of blame. 
And Brownies played a sterner part 
Than was intended at the start. 







When BrowTiies move to work w^e find 
They have a finish in their mind, 
And vain is every kick and shift 
Against a supernatural gift. 

119 



THE ]5R0\VNIES FIND WORK FOR THE VETERINARY. 



The Brownies could not stay in tovm, 

After tliey brought the creatures clown; 

They could not wait about, to see 

What was the ciu'e or remedy; 

For soon the arrows of the sun 

Forced elfin-folk to break and run. 

But when the doctor next stepped out, 

And saw the creatures ranged about, 

Both old and young, too weak to stand. 

And waiting for his skillful hand, 

He picked his steps among the maimed, 
With di-ugs, that close attention claimed, 
From drops to brace the sinking heart 
To those that give the hair a start. 
And cried, "This is no conmion call. 
The Brownie rogues have done it all!" 





120 





THE BROWNIES AND THE 

ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT 



TOWN'S electric plant was bad, 
J 'T was even worse, and made one sad 
To think npon the dark and gloom 
That nightly made the streets a tomb. 
The bumps from trees and hitching posts, 
That in the darkness loomed like ghosts. 
Made people to their homes retreat. 
Or with a lantern take the street. 
When Bro\\aiies paused to look around 
Upon this dark suburban ground, 
Said one, '^It matters not to us 
That streets are badly lighted thus; 
We 're like the beetle, bat, 

and owl. 
When sun goes down, and 
creatures prowl, 

121 




THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



And night's black veil drops to its place 
To hide the smiles on nature's face. 
But to the folk who must obey 
A call to bedside, or to pay 
A friendly visit at the gate, 
Or catch a train that will not wait, 
'T is quite a different sort of thing, 
And we should some improvement 

bring." 
Another said, "You 're right, 

my friend. 
This state of thing we ought 

to mend. 
They turn the lights out 
here, you know, 
Soon as the moon begins 




And through the month thus try to keep 
Expenses down, and profit reap. 
122 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



The doctors of the tovm 

alone 
Are domg well, through 

broken bone, 
And ankle twisted out 

of shape. 
Or knee that 's suffered 

through a scrape ; 





Tlie planet 
hides its 

In its own 
a spread. 



here that 
head 
orbit cuts 



It is a common sight to see 

The surgeons treating two or three, 

Or four of those who badly fare 

When crossing bridge or street or square." 

"Well, knowing this, our duty's plain," 
A third remarked. "At once we '11 gain 
An entrance to the plant below 
Prom which they draw this fitful glow, 
And learn what changes should be made- 
There 's much to do, I am afraid." 
They found the plant down in a nest 
Beside a stream, and small at best, 
123 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



Away from bustle and 

from noise, 
Unseen for weeks by 

even boys. 
It chanced to be the time 

of night 




When people needed little light, 
And men that should be stirring most 
Were not that moment at their post, 



Which served the Brownies' purj)ose well- 
But I must tell you what befell ! 
Said one, ''We '11 move the whole affair 
And plant it in the village square, 
Where citizens can step aside 
And look upon the plant with pride ; 
While when the work 's completed right 
The towm wall have a better light." 

124 




THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 




Then in accordance with their plot, 

The plant w^as moved quite to the spot. 

Machinery of any kind 

Is no light burden, keep in mind. 

And when stone cold 'tis hard to bear, 

But worse when steam is captured there, 

That in its own peculiar vein 

To make escape keeps up the strain, 



And, if they had not mystic power, 
Some parts would at this 

very hour 
Be lying near the former 

place 
Instead of in the chosen 

space. 
We cannot stop at such 

a time 
To add more reason to the rhjmie, 

125 




THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 




'T was heavier work, to wliicli they set 
Their liancis that night, than they liad met 

126 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTKIC LIGHT PLANT. 



In months of 

rambling, high, 
or low, 
To render aid 

where it 
should go. 
With brass, and steel, 

and iron, mixed 
'T was not a matter 

lightly fixed ; 





Few things they 
found that one 
could bear. 
And half a dozen 
took their 
share, 
Around the heavy 
Inirdens 
bent, 



Before they smoothly 

onward went. 

To iujiire neither 

foot nor hand, 

Nor sjjread confusion 

thrpugh the band, 

Required their supernatural 

gift, 
The strength to pull, 

the brawn to lift. 

127 





THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



The pillow block was not a weight 
To carry at a lively gait, 




And shoulders stooped, 
and bodies bent. 
And all the band were tired and spent. 
Had people been out over-late 
And met them in their active state 




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128 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 





I know not what tliey would 

have done — 
Perhaps the,y 'd run and run 

and run! 
But if they had not second sight 
They could not see a smgle sjirite, 
For Brownies may be there in rows, 
Or working at one's very nose, 
And if the gift is not your own 
You simjoly move about alone. 
A building, serving well their need, 
That vacant stood was found with speed ; 
And there the plant took form once more 
With all its parts as heretofore. 
To plant machinery in place 
Takes sense and skill in every case. 
The wheels must true and level lie. 
The belt around the pulley fly. 




'T is wood indeed to 
bend the knee, 

But let the hands and 
head agree. 




fl' Ricle on r/]f beir. 

And keep its place upon the shaft 
Or there '11 be trouble fore and aft. 
Long before day, for Brownies' powers 
Seemed doubled with the passing liours, 
129 



THE BROWISriES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



The plant was ready for the touch 

Of those who understood how much 

To pull the lever, and huprove 

Their chance to see things quickly move. 

Before they took their homeward way, 

To try the plant, and to display 




The light in streets and lecture halls 
And rooms designed for fairs and balls. 
They had so excellent a chance 
Some practised at the latest dance; 

130 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



In churches old they tried 



the light 



At darkest watches of 
the night, 




""^Mcq any. 




Where one from lessons on the page 
Gave out some truths for youth and age ; 
~" And others laughter did create 

By promptly passing round the plate. 
But little change the Brownies bear 
About their clothes, to church or fair, 
And empty platters brought no haul 
For Foreign Fund, or local call. 
131 



THE BEOW^aES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



The cliildi'en, sleeping in the bed, 

Had jets of 
light flashed 
overhead, 
But weary with 
their hearty 
play, 
All unawakened, 
slept away. 




The cellar stairs and 

way to roof, 
Of perfect work gave 

dazzling proof, 
And in the pantry, all 

the shelves 
Showed brightly to the 

hungry elves 




132 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



The things to eat, or harbor well 
Till company should ring the bell ; 
The cake, the jam, preserves, and pie 
Were temptingly spread to the eye. 
The night was long, and hunger keen, 
And it was hard to quit the scene ; 





Men wield a sword to 
save a king, 

And after from a gal- 
lows swing. 



Sometimes, temptations prove too strong 
For those who wish to do no wrong. 
And even Brownies sometimes yield 
When richest dainties are revealed; 
But though they looked at pie and cake. 
And criticised the size and make, 
And talked of jelly, jam and tart 
And cooking as a vital art, 
They broke no crust, and crumbed no floor. 
But left things as they were before. 
1.33 



THE BROWNIES AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 




The Children's Home they 

tried the last, 
Before the night was 

fully passed, 
And from the base to 

greatest height, 
It showed up like 

a beacon light. 
And well they knew no little tot 
Need grope in darkness to its cot. 



Then, as the dawn began 

to spread 
Along the east its streaks 

of red. 
And drowsy fowls, that 

under thatch 
"Would rather rest than 

rise and scratch. 





And nearby roosters, wakeful long. 
Were crowing lustily and strong, 
The Brownies with a cautious mind 
Soon left the waking iovm behind. 
134 




'^mmimm 




THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS 

CHURCH was Imilt, or nearly so, 
In styles of churches long ago. 
Upon the hill it stood alone, 
The walls were laid of brick and stone, 

The roof aslant with rafters long, 

The entrance ready for the throng. 

The windows and the pews in place, 

While painters had with all kept pace. 

When Brownies on the structure cast 

Inquiring glances as they passed, 




THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS HELLS. 



Said one: "Though all seems done below 
Thei'e 's something lacking, as we know, 
For in that belfry on the crest 
No bell as yet has f omid a rest. ' ' 
Another said: "As Christmas Day 
Is nigh at hand, we '11 quit our play 
And do our part with Brownie zeal. 
So bells may ring their merry i:)eal. 
A foundry near with some in store 
Will be the place we '11 now^ explore, 




The pistol pops, and 
who must (lie? 

The hapless stranger 
passing by. 




And when the midnight 

comes about 
Our chimes will ring 
a welcome out." 
The foundry sure enough 

was found 
Where brazen bells were 
standing round ; 
Some just from moulds, both large and small, 
More fixed with clapper, crank and all. 
And ready for their final home 
In humble spire or shining dome. 
By halves the Bro\^Tiies nothing do. 
They work with zest and carry through 
The plans complete they have in sight, 
However short may be the night. 
And now, although one sounding bell 
Could summon all the people well, 
A perfect chime of sweetest tone 
Would satisfy the band alone. 

136 




THE BKOVVNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 




Those knowing best the 

Bro^\1lie way 
Will not be doubting, 

when we say 
Some bells were from 
the foundry rolled 
Before the metal quite 
was cold, 
Or carried off on poles of. length 
"Where many sprites could prove 

their strength 
In such a hurry, one may know, 
There were surprises, 

high and low; 
And Brownies, who to 

help essayed, 
Were more a hindrance 

than an aid. 
Across the bridge, and 

past the mill, 
To reach the church 

upon the hill 
They made their way with stoop and crawl, 

And painful stmnble, too, and fall. 
The bells were muffled with all care, 
So not a sound broke on the air. 
As through the town the cunning band 
Proceeded with the work in hand. 
At times, in spite of every art, 
A steep decline would give a start; 
137 





THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 




One must see Brownies in a plight 
To nnderstand their nature right, 
And note how skillfully is laid 
The plan, that all may render aid. 
To reach the 

building brought 
a strain. 
That proved the 

nerves as well 
as brain; 
For hasty action 

tries the best, 
No matter of 

what strength possessed 



They feared the bells 

downhill would roll 
If of their loads 

they lost control. 
And it was well the 

Brownies' speed 
Was equal to their 

pressing need. 
Though wild the whirl 

and steep the hill. 
They kept their wits 

about them still. 
And shouted loud to 

clear the way, 
For started once, they 

could not stay. 




138 



THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 



It took few orders, for 
the band, 
The enterprise had 

fully planned, 
To keep things 
moving fairly fast 

With promise of 
success 
at 
last. 




The task looked hard enough, but all 
Their burdens carried to the wall. 
But that seemed play, when they began, 
With rope and chains that upward ran 
139 



THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 




To hoist the bells by pull and pry 

To stations in the belfry high. 

Said one : "We 've gone too far, I fear, 

To risk our necks on timbers here, 

To put a bunch of bells in place 

To please the thankless human race, 

Who oft are slow to do 
their share — ■ 
Though others toil, 
they do not 
care. ' ' 
Another said: 
"Be slow to 
scold, 
Or criticise, but 
keep your liold. 
140 




THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 



Within an hour we '11 have our way 
And welcome ring to Christmas Day. 
Let peojjle, if they will, be slow 
To hear the call, the tidings know, 
Or quite neglect to bend the knee — 
The task 's the same for you and me, 
To place these bells where they will ring 
And echoes from the Heavens bring." 
Then dangers low and dangers 

high 
Were in their pathway ever 

nigh, 
For some were 

quick the ropes 

to strain, 
While more were 
slow their place 

to gain, 
And could do little else than 

cling 
And take what cheer advice 

could bring. 
The sailor who has cruised 

around. 
For forty years the sea 

and sound, 
Will calmly face the boisterous 

air 

That sends the landsman to 

his prayer. 

^ -^ 141 




THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 




Thus sprites that many 

daBgers meet 
Are somewhat 
slow to own 
defeat. 
So one by one, 
through mystic 
sleight, 
The bells were 

hoisted to the height 

Where far above foundation stones 
They blended their melodious tones. 
It took some knowledge of the stroke 
To shun the dirge for burying folk. 
And ring glad peals to wake the earth, 
And call to mind the Glorious Birth. 
In ways peculiar to the band 
Tliey rang the bells with willing hand. 
In fact it caused no little smart 
That all could not at this take part, 
For every hand was itching there 
A portion of the task to bear, 

But those must toll who knew the rules, 
Set by ecclesiastic schools, 
And as the clock proclaimed the time, 
From out the belfry pealed a chime 
That made the sleeper lift his head 
And leap in wonder from the bed. 
Not till that night, o'er valley wide. 
Or up the wooded mountainside, 
142 




THE BKOWMKS' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 



Was suck a pleasing story told 

To charm the ear of young and old. 

Amazement spread, still rising higher, 

As joyous notes broke from the spire, 

And trembled on the midnight clear 

That happy tidings all must hear. 

It meant not war, with striving fraught. 

Too sweet the sound for such a thought. 





The well timed tap, 

that told so much. 
Proved knowledge was 

behind the touch, 
The pull at intervals, 

so stout. 
Told Avhat instruction 

can bring out. 
While no wild discord, 

hard to hear. 
Was forced upon 

the troubled ear. 
Within their stalls 

the cattle rose, 
The horses neighed, 

the story goes, 
The fowl upon their 

roost awoke 
And crowed, upon 

the earliest 
stroke, 



143 



THE BROWNIES' CHRISTMAS BELLS. 




"While children questions asked that none 
Could answer at the rise of sim. 
And though in haste men gained the hill, 
When they arrived, the church was still. 
The sound had hardly died away 
From largest bells, the foremost say, 
Still not a cunning Brownie sprite 
Around the building was in sight. 

They marveled at the wonder great — 

Plow came those bells of size and weight 

Within that belfry, high in air, 

And not a hmnan being there. 




One, single-handed, 

much may do 
But devils shake when 

facing two. 




144 




COVER BOOK SYS' 



The Queen Silver=Bell 
Fairy Books 

By Frances Hodgson Burnett 

Here are four books, each one 
different, yet each having as a 
background the same Silver- 
Bell, the fairy queen, and each 
having hidden deep within its 
folds of fancy and humor and 
color a little moral as to keeping 
one's temper or loving the flow- 
ers or caring for the birds or 
having kind thoughts in general. 
The tales are half fairy and half 
nature, but wholly sweet and 
refreshing. 

The author of "Little Lord 
Fauntleroy" has never written 
anything more charming than 
the Silver-Bell books, of which 
these are the titles: 

The Spring Cleaning 

The Cozy Lion 

Queen Silver-Bell 

Racketty-Packetty House 

Each book is illustrated by Mr. 
Harrison Cady in a sympathetic way 
that is as appealing as the text, and 
all the pictures are printed in the 
original colors. 

Bound in blue cloth, with cover 
picture in color. Price, each, 
60 cents. 

THE CENTURY COMPANY 





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